Africa

Saving the Cheetah-one big cat

My mom was terrified of cats. She was also allergic to them-- which probably was the reason for being so scared of them. As a kid I can remember her little scream when she saw a cat out of the corner of her eye and then and pulling me or my brother in front of her to hide.

I am not sure if it was because of her reaction to cats of just because but I have never been a huge fan. I have a minor allergic reaction to them myself--- if pet one and then touch my face it is all over-- but I can be in a room with them without much issue-I am not a fan of them rubbing up against me however, and they always seem to love the ones that don’t love them back.

So when we were told we were visiting the Cheetah Conversation Fund in Namibia I was interested to learn more and and decided this wasa great opportunity to get a better understanding for the mysteries of the feline family .

I had stumbled across the Cheetah Conversation Fund in my research on Namibia and recognized it was a highlight to see when traveling to this east African country.  

Cheetah Namibia


Founded in 1990 by Dr. Laurie Marker, her name is synonymous with Cheetahs.
Her dedication to the preservation and growth of the Cheetah populations is truly inspirational.


Until visiting the reserve to be honest I didn’t know my cheetah from my leopard.
I had no idea that Cheetah’s were an endangered specifics and readily killed by humans because of their perceived threat to livestock and readily traded on the black market primarily in Arab countries. All I knew is that they are the fastest animal on earth with top speeds of 60mph.

Spending a day with the Cheetah’s and the people who pledge to protect them gave me new insight into their beauty and grace and their importance to the ecosystem.

Watching these elegant creature glide across the plains and hold their heads in a constant position of pride I found a new and unexpected affection for these big cats. I think even my mom would have a new appreciation for these felines after seeing them in their natural habitats.